Opening Hours

Monday: 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Tuesday: 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Wednesday: 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Thursday: 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Friday: 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Cause of Bedwetting

Bedwetting Causes, Why does this happen?

Parents and Doctor’s have tried for ages to determine the bedwetting causes for children. From children to adults wetting the bed is the unspoken enemy that families everywhere face.  Usual suggestions include:

To combat bedwetting, doctors suggest:

  1. Shift times for drinking. …
  2. Schedule bathroom breaks. …
  3. Be encouraging. …
  4. Eliminate bladder irritants. …
  5. Avoid thirst overload. …
  6. Consider if constipation is a factor. …
  7. Don’t wake children up to urinate. …
  8. Don’t resort to punishment.

However, these suggestions only address the symptoms and not the root cause of bedwetting.

Sadly when methods above don’t work parents often feel forced to try traditional methods for stopping bedwetting including bed wetting alarms, pills, and homeopathic drops.  Some parents even resort to shock treatments to alert the child of their accident.

The feeling of relief to learn it is not something that is a behavioral problem but a physiological side effect changes lives. Finally, we are able to share the true cause behind bedwetting and other symptoms related to Sleep Disordered Breathing.

Understanding Bedwetting

Understanding the connection

Only in the last 20 years has clinical research established the connection between certain increasingly common childhood health issues and a single likely root cause – Sleep Disordered Breathing (SDB).
The symptoms associated with SDB can vary from one child to the next, but even mild SDB (mouth breathing, crowded teeth, snoring) can point to serious underlying health issues and the need for treatment.

ADD

Children with SDB are 40 to 100 percent more likely to exhibit behavioral and emotional problems, including hyperactivity, anxiety, depression, social issues with peers, and conduct problems, including aggressiveness (Bonuck, 2012).

Delayed or Stunted Growth

Pediatric sleep disorders impact a child’s behavioral, cognitive, and physical development, with long-term consequences (Bonuck, Parikh, & Bassila, 2006; Montgomery & Dunne, 2007)

Bedwetting

“Our 11 year old son wet the bed 3-4 nights a week. We started treatment in Healthy Start mainly to avoid braces. After just one week, the bedwetting stopped completely. After 8 or 9 months, his teeth were perfectly straight. Amazing!” – Karen H.

 

Snoring

Children with cross bites (misaligned upper and lower teeth) are 3.3 times more likely to suffer from SDB, while children with convex facial profiles (i.e. receding chins) are 2.6 times more likely (Finland Study 2013, published in European Journal of Pediatrics).

Crowded or Crooked Teeth

Children with cross bites (misaligned upper and lower teeth) are 3.3 times more likely to suffer from SDB, while children with convex facial profiles (i.e. receding chins) are 2.6 times more likely (Finland Study 2013, published in European Journal of Pediatrics).

Nightmares / Night terrors

Children with wide, forward dental arches who breathe through their nose sleep better, and children who sleep better perform better in school, behave better, and experience fewer health issues.
Unfortunately, childhood sleep disorders are becoming far more prevalent among our youth, and far too many parents and healthcare providers are unaware of the dire consequences.

Difficulties in School

Prescription drugs, surgery, clinical therapy, academic tutors, sleep aids, and years in metal braces have been the most commonly prescribed “solutions.” Yet none of these conventional treatments can promote or develop a child’s airway and help them get the oxygen and sleep they need to thrive.

Restless Sleep

Mouth breathing is not the same as nasal breathing and often leads to further compromises in the airway. Mouth breathing is often cited as a contributing factor in a compromised airway, and in patients who require orthodontic treatment. It can also prevent the proper function of the tongue and other orofacial muscles children need to speak, swallow, chew, and function. Mouth breathing can also cause the delicate tissues of the tonsils and adenoids to swell and become enlarged, which can further restrict the airway and thus perpetuate the cycle of needing to mouth breathe

Chronic Allergies

“We believe elimination of oral breathing, i.e., restoration of nasal breathing during wake and sleep, may be the only valid “finish line” in pediatric sleep disordered breathing.” C. Guilleminault, S. Sullivan, 2014 – Stanford University

Aggressive Behavior

Children with SDB are 40 to 100 percent more likely to exhibit behavioral and emotional problems, including hyperactivity, anxiety, depression, social issues with peers, and conduct problems, including aggressiveness (Bonuck, 2012).

Daytime Drowziness

Prescription drugs, surgery, clinical therapy, academic tutors, sleep aids, and years in metal braces have been the most commonly prescribed “solutions.” Yet none of these conventional treatments can promote or develop a child’s airway and help them get the oxygen and sleep they need to thrive.

Smaller lower jaw

In our modern world of limited breastfeeding and soft, processed foods, far too many of our children are simply not developing fully in their lower facial areas. If allowed to persist during their formative early years, this condition prevents proper growth and development of a child’s airway.

Bedwetting can be caused by a compromised airway which can lead to Sleep Disordered Breathing (SDB). Over just the past 20 years, compelling research from around the world has forged important links between SDB and certain childhood health issues that plague as many as 9 out of 10 children. These health issues include such commonly diagnosed conditions:

Bedwetting Causes

Bedwetting Causes
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